Knee Brace Guide

Knee Brace Guide

When it comes to the treatment of knee injuries, the knee brace is one of the first things that come to most people’s minds. But what exactly is a knee brace? Generally speaking, a knee brace (also known as a knee orthosis) is a brace that is worn to support a painful or injured knee. Knee braces are made from various materials, including plastic, metal and foam. They are available in several colors, sizes and designs.

Types of Knee Braces

Knee braces fall into four categories, which are the following:

Preventive Knee Braces

Prophylactic Knee Brace

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A preventive knee brace (also known as a prophylactic brace) is a knee brace that has individual or joint bars, hinges and adhesive straps. True to its name, it prevents sports-related injuries to the knee from happening in the first place. It does this by protecting the knee from excessive force during contact sports (e.g. football, hockey and boxing). The preventive knee brace’s malleable bars are capable of absorbing impact, reducing the force applied to the knee by 10% to 30% (Jenkins, 2005).

Functional Knee Braces

Functional Knee Brace

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Love sports but already have a history of knee injury? If yes, then you definitely need a functional knee brace. A functional knee brace provides support to knees that were previously injured. It does this by enabling an athlete with unstable knees to exercise vigorously without subjecting the knee joint to excessive stress that can cause dislocation (pathological subluxation). The functional knee brace likewise alters the pattern of muscle activity in the lower extremities during exercise—work at the hip is increased and work at the knee is decreased.

Rehabilitative Knee Braces

Rehabilitative Knee Braces

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A rehabilitative knee brace is used right after knee surgery and during knee rehabilitation. It limits the knee’s movement while the knee is healing. A rehabilitative knee brace is used alongside crutches for two to eight weeks after an injury or surgery. Compared to a splint or a case, a rehabilitative knee brace is more palliative because it allows the knee to move, is adjustable (to relieve swelling) and is removable (so that the doctor or physical therapist can check the injured knee from time to time). A rehabilitative knee brace is typically made of foam liners, adjustable rigid bars and non-elastic straps (to keep the brace in place). It is commonly available off-the-shelf.

Unloader or Offloader Knee Braces

Unloader & Offloader Knee Brace

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Got medial (inner part of the knee) compartment knee osteoarthritis? Are you waiting to have knee replacement surgery? If your answer to one or both of these questions is yes, chances are, your doctor will give you a prescription for an unloader knee brace (also referred to as an offloader knee brace). True to its name, the unloader knee brace reduces stress on the affected joint by increasing the pressure on the thigh bone. In the process, the knee is forced to bend away from the affected joint and, ultimately, pain is reduced. An unloader knee brace is prefabricated and is made of cast plastic, steel and foam (to limit knee movement from side to side).

Knee Brace Models

As mentioned earlier, knee braces have four general classifications. But knee braces also have different models (e.g., neoprene sleeve, knee immobilizer and a hinge brace). Knee brace models are classified according to certain factors (e.g., function, knee parts protected, etc.). Below are the different models of knee braces:

Hinge Knee Brace

Hinge Knee Brace

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The hinge knee brace is perfect for people who suffer from knee instability and pain. It provides the knee with strong lateral stabilization—simply put, it prevents the knee from hyperextending or getting out of alignment. The hinge knee brace’s rigid bars help keep the knee in place, as well as prevent further strain to the ligaments. The additional features of the hinge knee brace are as follows:

  • Padded buttresses – Cushions the patella (kneecap) and keeps it in place.
  • Side hinge pockets – Ensures that the brace will fit any knee size.
  • Criss-crossing elastic straps – Makes the brace easy to put on and take off.
  • Neoprene-blend material – To keep the knee warm.
  • Smooth edges and longer length – Makes the brace more comfortable to use.
  • Cinch straps – Makes the brace adjustable.

ACL Knee Brace

ACL Knee Brace

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Just like what its name suggests, the ACL knee brace is used for the rehabilitation of torn or damaged anterior cruciate ligaments. ACL knee braces come in various types, which will be further discussed below:

  • Everyday and low-impact sports knee braces – These braces enable people with torn ACL to engage in walking and low-impact sports activities. They are ideal for athletes who want to prevent ACL injuries, as well as those who want to get back into sports following knee surgery.
  • Intermediate level knee braces – If you want to prevent ACL while engaging in moderate-level physical activity, then the intermediate level knee brace is for you. It protects the knee joints during pivoting motion, preventing conditions and injuries like ACL, arthritis and torn meniscus.
  • Lightweight support for non-contact sports – These braces are extremely lightweight—one of their main components is aircraft-grade aluminum. Hence, they are perfect for people with mild ACL tears who wish to engage in non-contact sports.
  • Sturdy, low-profile braces suitable for contact sports – Made of aluminum, these braces are durable but light enough to be worn comfortably during sports. They also have covered hinges that protect clothing from getting destroyed during sports or exercise.
  • Custom-made, technologically superior braces for high-impact sports and water sports – These braces are made-to-order and are completely lightweight. Hence, they are suitable for people who want to engage in all kinds of sports despite having moderate to severe knee problems. A fitting from a qualified medical professional is required before you can benefit from a custom brace.

Patellofemoral Knee Brace

patellofemoral knee brace

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The patellofemoral knee brace is used to treat patellofemoral pain syndrome (also known as runner’s knee). The brace treats the said condition by reducing swelling and restoring the natural alignment of the upper and the lower knee. The patellofemoral knee brace can also be used for minor sprains and strains, as well as pain due to arthritis. The additional features of the patellofemoral knee brace are as follows:

  • Bifurcated (two-pronged) strap – Reduces pain and restores the natural alignment of the upper and lower knee.
  • Soft and tacky buttress pad – Clings snugly to the knee to provide a consistent corrective force to the patella during activity.
  • Thigh and calf anchors – Keeps the brace in place by preventing it from rotating.
  • Breathable neoprene fabric – Makes the brace comfortable, anti-microbial, hypoallergenic and lightweight.
  • Plastic hinges – Enhances the brace’s overall support by giving additional medial and lateral stability.

Neoprene Sleeve

Neoprene Sleeve

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A neoprene sleeve is ideal for the treatment of minor sprains and strains, as well as pain due to arthritis. The soft neoprene cloth provides warmth and improves blood circulation to the knee, healing knee injuries and increasing joint flexibility in the process. The additional features of the neoprene sleeve are as follows:

  • Comfortable contoured fit – Ensures uniform and constant compression.
  • Flatlock seams and nylon-trimmed ends – These make the brace durable, flexible, quick-drying and anti-bacterial.
  • Extra-long length – For maximum knee and upper shin protection.
  • Open patella – Helps relieve pressure on the kneecap.

Knee Immobilizer

Knee Immobilizer

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A knee immobilizer is a knee brace used right after a leg injury or surgery. It keeps the injured or newly-operated knee from bending, allowing the knee to heal properly. The additional features of the knee immobilizer are as follows:

  • Foam-fused fabric splint – Ensures that the knee immobilizer is breathable and comfortable.
  • Malleable and removable medial, lateral and posterior aluminum stays – They ensure that the knee immobilizer can be made to fit the shape of any leg to maintain a properly immobilized position.
  • Buckle and Velcro closures above and below the kneecap – For a secure fit.
  • Fully adjustable side panels – To accommodate varying leg circumferences.

Knee Brace Manufacturers

Knee brace manufacturing is an extremely lucrative industry. In 2011, the knee brace market constituted the largest sector of the US orthopedic bracing device market (Millennium Research Group, 2011). In the said year, the US knee brace market earned an estimated $1.2 billion (PR Newswire, 2013). This figure is expected to rise to nearly $1.4 billion by 2015 (Millennium Research Group, 2011) and $2.48 billion by 2018 (Zamanian, 2012). At present, the knee brace market is swamped with manufacturers. These companies churn out knee braces of various makes and models for numerous indications. Below are some examples of well-known knee brace brands:

ACE

When it comes to braces, ACE is probably the first brand that will come to most people’s minds. And for a good reason—ACE is a pioneer in the brace, bandage and compress industries. In 1918, Oscar O.R. Schwidetzky created the ACE (“All Cotton Elastic”) Bandage. This invention, in turn, led to the establishment of the ACE Brand, a trusted brand in elastic bandages for almost 100 years. The ACE Brand eventually diversified, expanding its product line to cater to the needs of a growing market. In 1976, ACE started manufacturing hosiery and braces. Adhesives conglomerate 3M acquired the brand in 2009, focusing its production on braces and supports, elastic bandages and hot and cold therapy products.

DonJoy

DonJoy is a product of DJO Global, Inc., a leading global manufacturer of orthopedic devices. DJO Global, Inc. is the product of the November 2007 merger of two companies: ReAble Therapeutics, Inc. (“ReAble”) and DJO Opco Holdings, Inc. (“DJO Opco”). Both companies are top manufacturers and distributors of orthopedic rehabilitation and pain management products. The said merger changed ReAble’s name to DJO Incorporated. Aside from DonJoy, DJO Global, Inc.’s brands include the following: Encore, Cefar, Empi, Ormed, Chattanooga, Compex, Aircast, OfficeCare, ProCare, SpinaLogic and CMF.

McDavid

The McDavid knee brace brand is produced by McDavid, Inc., an American company that produces and distributes sports medicine, protection equipment and performance apparel. The company started in 1969, when Dr. Robert F. McDavid invented the first lateral knee brace for football. The product’s success at the grassroots level led to the formal establishment of the company in 1980. Since then, the McDavid brand has diversified into various products that cater to the needs of athletes in almost every sport.

Mueller

The Mueller knee brace brand is produced by Mueller Sports Medicine, Inc., an American company owned by the Mueller family. Curt Mueller started the business in 1961. A former athlete, he was very much aware of the physical demands of sports. This steered him towards a career in sports medicine, fashioning sports medicine products in the basement of his father’s drugstore. By the early 1980s, Mueller Sports Medicine, Inc. was supplying retail markets with products under the Mueller Sports Care brand such as MTape, MWrap, the Medi-Kit trainer’s kit and Quench Mist.

Neo G

The Neo G knee brace brand is produced by the Australian orthopedics firm Neo G Ltd. The latter produces and distributes a wide range of orthopedic and support products for several purposes, body types and conditions. Aside from knee braces, Neo G Ltd. also produces ankle braces, clavicle braces, arm slings, bunion splints, etc.

Knee Brace by Support Level

As mentioned earlier, knee braces have various makes and models for numerous indications. Hence, knee braces offer different levels of support. It is extremely important to know the level of support a knee brace offers before using it. Doing so will not only maximize the knee brace’s efficacy; it will also help your knee heal properly.

Basic Knee Brace

Basic Knee Brace

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A basic knee brace offers a low level of support for the knees. It works in the following ways:

  • Its snug fit provides compression to the knee, supporting the soft tissues (muscles and ligaments) in the process.
  • It promotes faster knee healing by retaining heat in the knee. Heat increases blood circulation in the knee, which, in turn, heals knee injuries faster.

A basic knee brace can be used for the following indications:

  • Mild knee pain
  • Sprains
  • Arthritis
  • Weakness
  • Swelling
  • Patellar tendonitis or Jumper’s knee (microscopic damage to the patella tendon)
  • Cartilage irritation
  • Bursitis
  • Runner’s knee
  • Chondromalacia patella (softening and damage to the kneecap cartilage)
  • Osgood Schlatter disease (tension and inflammation below the kneecap)

A basic knee brace, however, cannot be used for moderate to severe knee instability and pain. Treatment of these conditions requires advanced or elite orthopedic knee braces.

Advanced Knee Brace

Advanced Knee Brace

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An advanced knee brace offers moderate support for the knees. As mentioned above, it can be used for the treatment of moderate to severe knee instability and pain. An advanced knee brace works in the following ways: Its snug fit provides compression to the knee, supporting the soft tissues (muscles and ligaments) in the process.

  • It promotes faster knee healing by retaining heat in the knee. Heat increases blood circulation in the knee, which, in turn, heals knee injuries faster.
  • Improves patellar tracking or kneecap stability.

An advanced knee brace can be used for the following indications:

  • Moderate knee pain
  • Sprain
  • Arthritis
  • Ligament injuries
  • Patellar tracking disorder (kneecap instability)
  • Runner’s knee
  • Chondromalacia patella
  • Osgood Schlatter disease
  • Weakness
  • Swelling
  • Patellar tendonitis or Jumper’s knee
  • Cartilage irritation
  • Bursitis

An advanced knee brace, however, cannot be used for severe knee instability and pain. Treatment of this condition requires an elite orthopedic knee braces.

Elite Knee Brace

Elite Knee Brace

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An elite knee brace offers maximum support and protection for the knees. It is often used on knees that were operated on or seriously injured. An elite knee brace works in the following ways:

  • Facilitates healing by offering sideway stability and preventing the knee from hyperextending (bending back too far).
  • Enables the patient to engage in daily activities and sports by supporting the knee and reducing pain.

An elite knee brace can be used for the following indications:

  • Cartilage tears
  • Arthritis
  • Chronic knee weakness
  • Ligament injuries

Knee Pads

Knee Pads

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A knee pad (also known as a gel knee pad) is used mainly to relieve knee pain. It is perfect for people who suffer from knee pain but have to engage in activities that involve kneeling for long periods of time (housework, gardening, roofing, carpet laying, etc.). Just what its other name suggests, a knee pad is filled with gel, which serves as cushioning for the knee. The gel protects the knee from stress by spreading out the pressure going through the knee (without a gel knee pad, pressure going through the knee is usually concentrated on one point of the latter). As a result, the knee heals faster. A knee pad can be used for the following conditions:

  • Chondromalacia patella
  • Osgood Schlatter disease
  • Arthritis
  • Anterior knee pain
  • Housemaid’s knee (inflammation of the bursa or fluid sac at the front of the knee)

How to Care for Your Knee Brace

To maximize your knee brace’s efficacy and shelf life, it is important that you know how to take care of it. Improper usage of knee braces will lead not only to wasted money; it will also lead to increased knee pain and delayed healing of knee injuries. Below are some tips on how to take care of your knee brace:

  • Follow the doctor’s instructions regarding care for your knee brace, as well as your knee brace’s specific fitting and care instructions.
  • When using your knee brace, see to it that the hinges are located where the knee bends and the straps and tapes are attached securely around your leg.
  • When engaged in physical activity, check the position of your brace. See to it that it has not moved.
  • Check your brace regularly for signs of wear and tear. Have any problems repaired immediately. Cover exposed metal to avoid injuring others. Replace worn-out knee braces.
  • When cleaning your knee brace, make sure that you follow the cleaning instructions that come with it. Never use bleach or fabric softener on your knee brace. Bleach will ruin the appearance of your knee brace, while fabric softener will reduce your knee brace’s ability to fit snugly around your knee and support it.

How do you know if it is time to replace your knee brace? Try answering this simple questionnaire as honestly as possible:

  • Has your knee brace begun to pill, stretch or tear?
  • Do the straps on your knee brace hold their length without stretching?
  • Are the straps that fit around your knee and leg stretched? Do they still hold tight to your knee and leg?
  • Did you lose or gain weight recently, resulting in a change in your leg size?
  • Do you notice any fraying fabric anywhere on your knee brace?
  • Is your knee brace starting to show signs of wrinkling or dimpling?
  • Is the fabric of your knee brace looking dingy, gray or stained from perspiration or everyday washing and wearing?
  • When you wear your knee brace, do you notice any bulge on your upper knee or lower leg?
  • Do you feel any discomfort or pain on your leg or knee when you wear your brace?
  • Do you have to tighten the straps of your brace more often to give your knee proper support?

If you answered yes to even one of these questions, then it is time to replace your knee brace. Keep in mind that you are doing your knees a disservice when you continue to wear worn-out braces. Usage of worn-out braces can delay the healing process. In addition, knee conditions and injuries can lead to longer therapy, medication or hospital stays if your knee brace is worn out. Rather than deal with these negative outcomes, put your old knee brace where it really belongs and buy yourself a new one. It never pays to save a little when you can lose a lot.

How to Train with Your Knee Brace

Most people think that it is extremely difficult, if not outright impossible, to train with a knee brace. Common sense, after all, dictates that you should not wear constricting clothing or accessories when engaging in exercise or sport. But the good news is that it is actually possible to train with a knee brace—the trick is to find the right training exercises. Proper exercise can help strengthen weak knees, as well as make injuries heal faster. Below are some tips on how to train while wearing a knee brace:

  • When performing a squat, see to it that your knees are right over your toes and ankles. As you flex your hips and drive them backward (like you were about to sit on a chair), make sure that both your heels and toes remain in contact with the floor. Do not do this tip if you cannot carry it out properly—improper execution of this tip might worsen your injury.
  • Avoid high-impact exercises. If you really must perform them, always land softly on the balls of your feet with slightly bent knees. Doing so will lessen the landing’s impact on your knees.
  • Make sure that you use a knee brace that is suitable for training. For instance, if you are doing various explosive or lateral movements, use a knee brace that is designed for functionality or patella stability. Using the wrong type of knee brace can worsen existing injuries and even lead to new ones.
  • When squatting, make sure that you do not break a parallel plane. If you have bad knees, chances are, you also have weak quadriceps and glutes (due to lack of exercise to the knees). Weak quadriceps and glutes can make you lose your balance and fall as you try to stand, further injuring your knees as a result.
  • Take it easy. Injuries do not heal overnight. Do not force yourself to perform strenuous exercises if your body is still unable to handle it. Start slowly but surely. Train on stable surfaces. Use the correct type of knee brace. Also, limit your exercises to those that you can do with good form and without experiencing pain.
  • If you want to engage in a cardiovascular workout, try swimming or moderate-level water aerobics. The buoyancy of the water reduces the amount of pressure going through the knees.
  • If you want to perform machine exercises, start out with lighter weights like the leg extension and the leg curl. But if you cannot fully bend or straighten your legs (the said devices require full flexion and extension of your legs), then try lighter weights instead. This will gradually increase the strength of your thighs, which, in turn, will help alleviate knee pain.
  • When squatting, hold on to a wall or any stable surface (countertops, tables, etc.) for added balance and stability.

On a more specific note, below are some exercises that can be done while wearing a knee brace:

Chair Knee Extension

  • While sitting on a chair, rest one leg on another chair.
  • Using only your leg muscles, gently push your leg towards the floor.
  • Hold for 5-10 seconds then release.
  • Repeat 5 times on each leg.

Heel Slide Knee Extension

  • Lie on your back with your left knee bent and left foot flat on the floor.
  • Slowly slide the left heel away from your body so that your left leg becomes parallel to your right leg. Hold for 5-10 seconds then return to starting position.
  • Repeat 5 times on each leg.

Knee Flexion

  • Sitting on a chair, tie a long towel around one foot. Make sure that your foot is resting flat on the floor.
  • With both hands, gently pull on the towel, raising your foot 4-5 inches off the floor. Hold for 5-10 seconds then release.
  • Repeat 5 times on each leg.

Wall Slide

  • Lean with your back against a wall.
  • Slowly slide down the wall while bending your knees at a 30-degree angle. Make sure that your legs remain parallel to your feet and your knees do not go out over your toes as you slide down. Straighten up again.
  • Repeat 5-10 times.

Bent-Leg Raises

  • While sitting on a chair, straighten one leg in the air (without locking the knee). Hold for about one minute.
  • Bend your knee to lower the leg about halfway to the floor. Hold for 30 seconds. Return to starting position.
  • Repeat 4 times on each leg.

Straight-Leg Raises

  • While sitting on a chair, rest one leg on another chair.
  • Lift the foot a few inches off the chair while keeping your leg straight. Hold for 5-10 seconds. Return to resting position.
  • Repeat 5-10 times. You can also steadily increase the amount of time you hold your foot up in the air (e.g., 2-3 minutes).

Abductor Raise

  • Lie on your side propped on one elbow. The leg touching the floor should be bent, while the leg on top should be straight.
  • Slowly lift the top leg, hold for 5 -10 seconds, then lower it down (you can use ankle weights if you can stand additional weight on your legs).
  • Do 1-3 sets with 12-15 repetitions each. Remember to rest in between sets.

Hamstring Curl

  • Stand with the front of your thighs against a surface (e.g., a table or a wall).
  • Flex one knee up as far as is comfortable. Hold for 5-10 seconds then lower it slowly. If possible, do not touch the floor between repetitions (you can use ankle weights if you can stand additional weight on your legs).
  • Do 1-3 sets with 12-15 repetitions each. Remember to rest in between sets.

Step-Ups

  • Stand in front of a step that’s about two feet high (e.g., a sturdy bench or stairs).
  • With your knees straight, step up onto the support and then step down.
  • Continue doing this for one minute slowly increasing your time as you get the hang of it. Once you get comfortable doing the workout you can pump your arms simultaneously.

Stationary Bike

  • Make sure that your legs are properly positioned. When pedaling, see to it that your knees are bent at a 15-degree angle.
  • Start biking for 10 minutes and slowly increase your time once you get comfortable doing the workout.

Static Inner Quadriceps Contraction

  • Push one of your knees down into a towel.
  • Put your fingers on your inner quadriceps to feel the muscle tighten during contraction. Hold for 5 seconds.
  • Repeat 10 times on each knee. Just make sure that you do not feel any pain when you do the exercise.

Quads over Fulcrum

  • Lie down on your back with a rolled towel (or foam) under one of your knees. Make sure that your knee is relaxed.
  • Slowly straighten your knee as far as possible, tightening the front of your thigh (quadriceps). Hold for 5 seconds.
  • Repeat 10 times on both knees. Just make sure that you do not feel any pain when you straighten your knee.

Static Hamstring Contraction

  • While sitting on a chair, bend one of your knees at a 45-degree angle.
  • Press your heel into the floor as hard as possible, tightening the back of your thigh (hamstrings). Hold for 5 seconds.
  • Repeat 10 times on both knees. Just make sure that you do not feel any pain when you do the exercise.

 Resistance Band Knee Extension in Sitting

  • Sit down on a chair with one of your knees bent and a resistance band tied around your ankle.
  • Slowly straighten your knee tightening the front of your thigh (quadriceps). Make sure that you keep your back straight while doing this step.
  • Perform 3 sets of 10 repetitions on each knee. Just make sure that you do not feel any pain when you do the exercise.

Resistance Band Hamstring Curl

  • Lie down on your stomach with a resistance band tied around one of your ankles.
  • Slowly bend your knee, tightening the back of your thigh (hamstrings).
  • Perform 3 sets of 10 repetitions on each knee. Just make sure that you do not feel any pain when you do the exercise.

Squat with Swiss Ball

  • Stand up straight with your feet facing forward and a Swiss ball placed between your lower back and the wall.
  • Slowly perform a squat. Make sure that your back remains straight and the Swiss ball does not fall to the floor. Keep your knees parallel to your toes and do not let them move forward past your toes.
  • Perform 3 sets of 10 repetitions. Just make sure that you do not feel any pain when you do the exercise.

Quad Clenches

  • Lie down on your back or sit up on the floor. Keep your legs and your knees straight.
  • Push one of your knees until you feel your thigh muscles clench. Hold for three seconds.
  • Perform 10-20 repetitions on each knee every 3-4 hours. Just make sure that you do not feel any pain when you do the exercise.

Straight Leg Raise

  • Lie down flat on the floor. Bend one leg and keep the other straight.
  • Lift the straight leg about 6 inches off the floor. Pull the toes towards you until you feel the muscle on the front of your thigh tighten or clench. Hold for 3-5 seconds and slowly lower it back down. Make sure that your leg remains straight.
  • Perform 10-20 repetitions on each knee twice a day.

Buttock Kicks

  • Lie on your stomach with your legs straight.
  • Lift one of your feet off the floor and bring it towards your bottom as far as you can. Slowly return to the starting position.
  • Do the same with your other foot.
  • Perform 10-25 repetitions on each leg thrice a day.

Kick Backs

  • Stand up straight holding on to something stable (e.g., a chair or a table).
  • Lift your foot up as far as you can towards your bottom, bending the knee. Hold for 3-5 seconds. Make sure that your body remains straight and your knees are still in line with each other.
  • Perform 5-25 repetitions on each leg twice a day.

The Bridge

  • Lie on your back with both knees bent at a 90-degree angle and both feet flat on the floor.
  • Lift your bottom off the bed as high as you can without arching your back. Hold for 3-5 seconds and then slowly lower back down.
  • Perform 10-25 repetitions on each leg once or twice a day.

Sit to Stand

  • Sit on a firm chair with both your feet flat on the floor.
  • Lean forward, lift your bottom and stand up straight. Sit back down again.
  • Perform 10-30 repetitions on each leg.

Knee Brace Quick Links

Knee Sleeves - Ideal for minor knee pain relief and warmth.
Soft Hinged Knee Braces - Moderate knee support during sports and other activities.
Rigid Hinged Knee Braces - Maximum protection and support.
Arthritis Knee Braces - Ideal for patients with osteoarthritis.
Patella Bands and Knee Straps - Alleviate patellar tendonitis and other patellar tendon problems.
Patella Stabilizers - Helps with patella tracking issues and knee alignment.
Knee Pads - Cushions around the knee to protect it from injury.
Knee Therapy - Check out our hot and cold therapy products for the knee.
Knee Immobilizers - Provides protection for your knee during rehabilitation.
Post-Op Knee Braces - Ideal knee support during recovery from surgery.
Knee Brace Accessories - Find the perfect addition to your knee brace.

References

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